Wild Market offers natural solutions

Located amidst the ice cream shops and candy stores in Maggie Valley’s Market Square is a different kind of establishment…
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What’s in the cards? Entrepreneurs go face-to-face with customers

Since late April, The Smoky Mountain News series on economic development has focused on the financial health of Haywood County, the mechanisms by which state, local and national governments encourage economic development and the various sectors that make up the county’s economy.
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What’s in the cards? Health care, social services provide double impact

A robust and vigorous health care sector is the cornerstone of any community; convenient access to health care facilities is a make-or-break issue for many, including the elderly, the disabled or even young families expecting children.
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What’s in the cards? Growing the greens

The cultivation of agriculture is the first and most important way Homo sapiens differentiate themselves from other creatures.
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What’s in the cards: Manufacturing starts small, thinks big

Inside a nondescript miniature warehouse off Carolina Boulevard, Drew Singleton hovers about an imposing, intimidating metalworking machine; adjusting a knob here, spinning a wheel there, tweaking an armature and then stopping to assess the situation, he pauses and looks up to re-check his settings.
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What's in the cards? Real estate industry growth comforting, concerning

The climate and topography of Haywood County make it a place that people want to live.
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What’s in the cards? Retail travails, prevails

On a rainy June Monday in Maggie Valley, wispy mists lick lush mountaintops that tower behind nearly every business in town, including the Cabbage Rose gift shop on Soco Road. 
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Haywood tourism authority reports robust growth

A lagging recovery from the Great Recession and the continuing loss of a major tourist attraction in Maggie Valley haven’t slowed growth of the tourism industry in Haywood County. 
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Management by measurement

There’s an old adage in business that says, simply, “If it isn’t measured, it isn’t managed.”
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What’s in the cards? It all starts with a visit

Since before the Great Smoky Mountains National Park was chartered in 1934, Western North Carolina has been a sought-after destination for tourists from across the country and across the world. 
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Cherokee chief removed from office: Lambert’s impeachment causes anger as primary election draws near

After three full days of testimony and four hours of waiting for a verdict, silence reigned at the Cherokee council house May 25 as Tribal Council convened to deliver its final decision on whether to remove Principal Chief Patrick Lambert from office.
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Lambert defends against impeachment charges

In the three days of testimony that comprised Principal Chief Patrick Lambert’s impeachment hearing, Lambert himself was by far the most prominent witness, spending a total of seven hours on the stand spread over two days. 
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A timeline of impeachment week

Impeachment hearings to consider charges against Principal Chief Patrick Lambert stretched on for three days last week, with Tribal Council holding four hours of closed-door deliberations before voting to remove Lambert from office. To view the impeachment hearings in their entirety, visit http://bit.ly/2rB4eED.
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Impeachment hearings: How they voted

Following three days of impeachment hearings, Tribal Council deliberated for four hours before returning to vote in open session. Each of the 12 charges against Principal Chief Patrick Lambert were announced individually, with councilmembers then standing up one by one to cast their vote as guilty, not guilty or abstained.
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Cherokee council removes Chief Lambert from office

After three full days of hearings, the Cherokee Tribal Council voted to remove Principal Chief Patrick Lambert from office yesterday.
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Impeachment hearings: The charges

The impeachment process set in motion during a February Tribal Council meeting reached its climax this week as Principal Chief Patrick Lambert faced a list of 12 charges during all-day impeachment hearings May 22-23.
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Impeachment hearings: Tribal members speak

The council house was packed to the gills Monday, May 22, as tribal members gathered to watch the impeachment proceedings against Principal Chief Patrick Lambert. They filled the seats, with additional fold-up chairs brought in to line the aisles. They stood in the halls, craning necks to watch the action, and they packed the lobby, where a livestream of the hearing played on a TV.
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Tiers of joy and sadness: State’s designation for Haywood brings mixed feelings

A recent designation by the North Carolina Department of Commerce could have a detrimental impact on Haywood County’s economic development efforts.
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What’s in the cards? National, state, regional partners play a role in local economic development

In the first installment of this series on Haywood County’s economic development, the analogy of a bathtub was used to illustrate the county’s economy: water flows in, water drains out and the freeboard is always changing, but amidst all the splashing, insular yet interconnected bubbles of industry rise and fall and swell and pop.
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Impeachment hearing scheduled for May 22

In the last minutes of a daylong session Thursday, May 11, the Cherokee Tribal Council voted to set a new hearing date for impeachment charges against Principal Chief Patrick Lambert. The vote scheduled the hearing for Thursday, May 18, but the date was later changed to 10 a.m. Monday, May 22, to accommodate the chief’s travel schedule.
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Cherokee court allows impeachment to continue

The Cherokee Supreme Court issued a pair of rulings last week that paved the way for impeachment efforts against Principal Chief Patrick Lambert to continue. However, the order left several key points of contention unaddressed, meaning the issue will likely continue to appear on the court schedule.
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Cherokee court lifts impeachment stay
 

Cherokee court lifts impeachment stay

A court-ordered stay over impeachment proceedings against Principal Chief Patrick Lambert has been lifted following an order filed at 5:09 p.m. Wednesday, May 10.
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Cherokee court hears arguments in impeachment lawsuit
 

Cherokee court hears arguments in impeachment lawsuit

Two days of hearings in the Cherokee Supreme Court wrapped up today, with the three-justice panel now charged with deciding whether to order a halt to impeachment proceedings against Principal Chief Patrick Lambert until the court can come to a final decision on the lawsuit challenging Tribal Council’s actions.
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What’s in the cards? Chamber, EDC try to stack the deck in Haywood’s favor

Among the various organizations involved in economic development, one often finds a Chamber of Commerce and some development organization.
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Distillery hopes to pack economic punch

If all goes well, Maggie Valley will soon be known as a place where some of the finest spirits in the world are crafted.
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Down in the flood

CeCe Hipps is one of the very few people in North Carolina who can say that she was at the epicenter of the two most significant postwar economic expansions in the state. 
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Cherokee court ruling declines to uphold Grand Council votes; Supreme Court to review decision

A recent ruling from the Cherokee Tribal Court has called the authority of Grand Council into question. Temporary Associate Judge Sharon Tracey Barrett denied a request for a court order stopping Tribal Council from pursuing impeachment against Principal Chief Patrick Lambert, though 84 percent of enrolled members who cast ballots during an April 18 Grand Council session voted to repeal the impeachment legislation.
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Impeachment stalled

Tribal Council will have to change the date set for Principal Chief Patrick Lambert’s impeachment hearing for the third time — if, that is, the Cherokee Tribal Court allows the impeachment to move forward.
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Grand Council vs. Tribal Council: Disagreement over Grand Council’s authority spurs lawsuit

It’s safe to say that the Cherokee Tribal Council is not scurrying to incorporate the decisions of Grand Council into its future actions. Tribal Council held a special-called meeting Wednesday, April 19 — the day after Grand Council was held — in which it set a new impeachment hearing date to comply with a recent order from the Cherokee Supreme Court and shot down an amendment…
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Tribal members discuss impeachment, Grand Council, and the state of the tribe

It would be near impossible to find someone in Cherokee these days who doesn’t know about the political turmoil enveloping the tribe, or who doesn’t have an opinion about who’s to blame. Last week The Smoky Mountain News ventured over to Food Lion, the Qualla Boundary’s only grocery store, asking tribal members for their take on the whole thing as they walked in to pick up…
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Cherokee chief receives massive support at Grand Council

Big Cove Road in Cherokee slowed to a standstill last week as traffic backed up for more than a mile, en route to Cherokee Central School and the Grand Council meeting that Principal Chief Patrick Lambert had called for 1 p.m. Tuesday, April 18. The spacious parking lot at Cherokee Central School, where the event was to be held, quickly reached capacity. Some drivers pulled off…
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Grand Council votes to stop impeachment

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians held its first Grand Council in 20 years yesterday, with traffic backing up for more than a mile down Big Cove Road as tribal members flocked to the event, held at Cherokee High School.
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Court denies lawsuit of anti-impeachment councilmember

The Cherokee Tribal Court has denied a complaint that Councilmember Teresa McCoy, of Big Cove, filed asking that the court restrain the Tribal Council from taking certain types of actions.
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Grounds for impeachment

The articles of impeachment passed by the Cherokee Tribal Council on April 6 outline seven grounds on which to remove Principal Chief Patrick Lambert from office. In a Facebook post, Lambert offered a counterpoint to each accusation. 
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Governmental crisis in Cherokee: Impeachment hearing scheduled for Chief Lambert

From the moment April’s Tribal Council session began — 8:30 a.m. sharp on the sixth — the Cherokee Council House was packed. Tribal members filled the seats and stood against the walls leading out to the lobby, where chairs in front of a TV broadcasting the meeting inside quickly reached capacity. Faces bearing expressions of sadness, or anticipation, or grim resignation, they waited for the action…
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Haywood School board races complicated, important

Haywood County Schools is at a crossroads, making this year’s crowded election for school board a pivotal one.
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Meadows’ challenger questions congressman’s ethics

Incumbent U.S. Rep. Mark Meadows and his challenger Rick Bryson have opposing views on the success of Meadows’ two terms…
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Tough choices for voters in Haywood commission race

Four more-or-less equally well-qualified candidates are competing for just two open seats on the Haywood County Board of Commissioners, leaving…
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Sales tax increase to appear on Swain ballot

Swain County residents will be asked whether they support an additional quarter-cent sales tax when they vote during the Nov.…
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Voters unsure about wording on county alcohol vote

Perhaps it’s because Haywood County residents haven’t seen such a measure since the Truman administration, but the wording on the…
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Challengers want change in Swain County

In this year’s commissioner election, Swain County residents will have to decide whether they are happy with the work done…
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Hipps and Davis race once more for Senate seat

Franklin orthodontist Jim Davis has held the District 50 seat in the N.C. Senate since 2010, when the legislature flipped…
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Will Presnell survive Schandevel challenge?

Rhonda Cole Schandevel is a survivor.  “I hate it. I miss him terribly,” she said, a limpid pool of tears…
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Candidates focus on Macon’s future

Macon County residents will more than likely recognize the names of the four commissioner candidates who will appear on their…
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Sylva’s homegrown talent

Nestled betwixt the Great Balsam and Plott Balsam ranges not far from Western Carolina University in Jackson County, the town…
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Edwards reflects on culture changes spanning 30 years in the workplace

In Western North Carolina’s travel and tourism community, it’s not too unusual to find women at the helm. But when…
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Passion for fashion

Sarah Miller has a glowing personality and limitless energy when it comes to pursuing her passion.
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Crossroads of art and community

It’s a constant flow. “All day people are coming in and out of the gallery, to wander the shop or…
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Designing your dreams

The “wow” effect. “When we reveal a project to a client and they have that ‘wow’ expression on their face…
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Rural animal care offers constant joy, constant challenge for vet clinic

It’s not unusual to hear a visiting veterinarian term Cherokee Animal Care Clinic an emergency day clinic, Dr. Robbie McLeod…
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