Haywood businesses, leaders react to reopening

The debate across the state still simmers — too soon, too late, or, like Goldilocks’ porridge, just right?

Hard-hit small businesses grapple with ‘new normal’

The nation’s annual Small Business Appreciation Week is held around this time each year and, coincidentally, couldn’t have come at a better time this year. 

Cosmetologists ready to get back to work

Melissa Walker opened her salon in Sylva in 2006, which means she’s been able to build a thriving business in a small town for 14 years even through all the challenges, including the 2008 economic recession. 

City Lights alters business model to weather dine-in closure

City Lights Café has been a fixture in Sylva since first opening its doors in 2011. Those doors are now closed as a result of the COVID-19 crisis, but behind them owner Bernadette Peters is working to find new ways to sustain her business even as dine-in eateries like hers are ordered closed. 

Rebuilding, brick by brick: MGC of WNC

Though most of us have acclimated to the idea and implementation of silence in this era of the Coronavirus Pandemic, the sounds of hammers and sawblades have been echoing down McCracken Street in Waynesville as of late.

Galleries adapt to the struggle of pandemic shutdown

Like much of the economy in Western North Carolina, art galleries in the region depend on tourism for survival. Just ask co-owner/manager of Twigs and Leaves, located in downtown Waynesville, Carrie Keith. 

Keeping the wheels in motion: Waynesville Tire

Though the front door is locked, the large garage and repair bays of Waynesville Tire are wide open and ready for business.

Maggie Valley looks forward to reopening

With the current stay at home order in place at least through May 8, the Maggie Valley Town Board of Aldermen is discussing putting a plan in place to begin reopening town businesses.

Planting for a pandemic: Agricultural community navigates through COVID-19 crisis

For farmers and agriculture businesses across Western North Carolina, spring is the time to plan and plant for the green season ahead, but uncertainty cultivated by the COVID-19 crisis is complicating that process, often in devastating ways. 

Fighting an uphill battle: Motion Makers Bicycle Shop

Emerging from the back of his bicycle shop in downtown Sylva, Motion Makers owner Kent Cranford squeezes around a service desk blocking the front entrance and steps outside to ensure he’s adhering to proper social distancing in the era of the coronavirus while being interviewed. 

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