Haywood vaccinations surge, other counties lag

The number of Haywood County residents receiving a first dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine jumped by 45 percent between Jan. 25 and Feb. 1, but vaccinations increased much more slowly over the same period in other mountain counties. 

Pro-bono legal service requests spike during COVID

As people continue to struggle through the COVID-19 pandemic, the demand for pro-bono legal services has spiked, putting more demand on nonprofit legal organizations like Pisgah Legal Services and Legal Aid.

Vaccinations climb in WNC

Staff at Jackson County Public Schools looking forward to COVID-19 vaccination got a welcome surprise last week when an impromptu clinic on Jan. 22 vaccinated 313 people who work for the school system. 

COVID vaccine supply diverted to larger counties

Just last week, Swain and Macon county health officials lamented over a limited supply of COVID-19 vaccines making it to them from Raleigh, and this week they have a better understanding of why. 

Vaccine distribution ramps up in Jackson

As the afternoon sun sank in the wintry sky Jan. 15, a line of first responders stretched 50-deep outside the front door of the Cullowhee Recreation Center, each person waiting their turn to participate in the first mass COVID-19 vaccination clinic to take place in Jackson County. 

COVID surge continues in Haywood County

As of Tuesday, Jan. 19, Haywood County Public Health received notice of 130 new cases of COVID-19 within the last four days.

Frustrations mount over vaccine roll out

Rural counties in Western North Carolina are feeling the frustrations with the national COVID-19 roll out plan. 

Jackson to hold vaccination clinic

Jackson County hopes to vaccinate 200 first responders and front-line emergency services staff with the first in a series of two COVID-19 vaccination shots during a clinic slated for 4 to 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 15, at the Jackson County Recreation Center in Cullowhee.

Uncertain season: ATC issues 2021 thru-hiking guidance as pandemic continues

Appalachian Trail thru-hiker season was already in full swing when coronavirus fears prompted widespread lockdowns in March, and the Appalachian Trail Conservancy was swift to react. 

Virtual nature: Highlands Biological gets creative with outreach amid pandemic

By Geoff Cantrell • Contributing writer | In a typical school year, Highlands Biological Station serves nearly 10,000 students through more than 250 programs for 50-plus schools across the mountain region. 

This was not a typical school year. 

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