COVID-19 cluster reported at Canton salon

The Haywood County Health and Human Services Agency, in consultation with the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services has identified a COVID-19 cluster connected to Enchanting Hair Fashions in Canton. 

WNC moves into new phase of COVID

As the number of new cases begins to stabilize in Western North Carolina, medical directors urge people to keep doing what they’re doing to prevent another spike. 

WCU manages pandemic as first cluster is reported

The third week of classes is now underway at Western Carolina University, and the Jackson County Department of Public Health has identified the first cluster on campus. 

Gov. Cooper eases some COVID restrictions

Trends in several key coronavirus metrics are stabilizing or declining, leading North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper to let up on some restrictions that have been in place for months.

Haywood COVID cases on downward trend

Haywood County Public Health received notice of 19 new cases of COVID-19 in the last week. As of 5 p.m. Aug. 27, the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services has recorded 493 cases in Haywood County.

Remote learning resumes Monday in Haywood

Haywood County Schools is scheduled to reopen for remote instruction on Monday, Aug. 31 after a significant cyber attack last Monday forced the school system to take down most technology services in order to stop the corruption of school system servers and computers.

WCU students start semester amid pandemic

The second week of classes at Western Carolina University is now underway, and while the COVID-19 Pandemic means that it’s shaping up to be an unusual semester, many students seem to be happy with how the university is handling the situation. 

College classes look different during COVID-19

College students around the nation adjust to a new normal amidst COVID-19.

Navigating this new normal as a mom and a teacher

By Laurie Bass

Years from now, when we look back on the fiasco that is 2020, I wonder how we will feel about our foray into virtual learning and teaching. Will it be one of those experiences that time smiles upon, casting it in a friendlier light? Will we think about the extra time we got with our children and smile wistfully? Will we pat ourselves on the back for navigating uncharted territory with gumption and grit? Or, more realistically, will we shake our heads and praise the Lord on high that it was just a short season, and against all odds and despite many setbacks, we survived it and our children did too?

Back to school results in more COVID-19 cases

Even before Macon County students resumed classes Aug. 17, administration was already seeing the results of teachers returning to school.

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