When the job can’t stop: Trash collection picked up during the pandemic

When meetings moved to Zoom and schools shut down last March, Zach Sorrells kept on reporting to work. As a maintenance worker with the Town of Sylva, he’s responsible for jobs that simply must get done, pandemic or no — like trash collection, for instance.

Global market for recyclables is down in the dumps

Local governments try to do their best in keeping recyclables out of local landfills, in part because it extends the life of the landfill and saves taxpayers money, and in part because of the tremendous energy savings realized when something like a glass bottle is made into a new glass bottle. 

Local waste management resources expensive, finite

Most people don’t give a lot of thought to what happens when they throw something away, but the ecological and economic consequences of the western consumerist lifestyle don’t end when that bag, bottle or box hits the garbage can. 

Market is down, but Macon County recycling continues

While the global market for recyclable materials can fluctuate month to month, Macon County residents are encouraged to continue utilizing the county’s recycling program.

Single stream increases recycling in Swain

Swain County has had a recycling program in place since the 1990s, but a recent change over to a single-stream recycling program has increased participation among residents. 

‘Zero Waste’ group forms in Haywood

Recycling is great but there is more people can do if they want to keep trash out of the landfill — don’t produce as much trash.

Zen and the art of trash removal

By Evan Boyer • Guest Columnist

A few months ago, some legal trouble loomed over me, and I was told that it would be in my best interest to start doing community service. My mom mentioned Haywood Waterways. I contacted Christine O’Brian, and she told me about Howell Mill Road, the trash surrounding it and how it was increasing her blood pressure day by day. I needed hours, she needed help. So I donned a vest, grabbed a grabber, and set out to clean Howell Mill. 

Illegal dumping plagues Swain

Swain County recently spent more than $350,000 in order to better secure its trash site and cut down on sanitation department costs, but recent illegal dumping continues to be a costly and time-consuming problem.

Swain trash site changes go into effect Sept. 1

Beginning Sept. 1, Swain County residents will notice some big changes when they go to drop off their trash and recycling at the convenience center. 

Jackson hopes to end the free ride for out-of-county dumpers

fr trashSuspicions that people are concealing old sofas and worn-out mattresses over state and county lines to dump on the sly in Jackson is irking county commissioners, but stopping the illicit trash smugglers could be tough.

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