Requisitos de ciudadanía para los sobrevivientes que solicitan asistencia de FEMA

La Agencia Federal para el Manejo de Emergencias (FEMA, por sus siglas en inglés) se compromete a ayudar a todos los sobrevivientes de desastre elegibles a recuperarse de la tormenta tropical Fred, incluyendo los ciudadanos estadounidenses, los nacionales no ciudadanos y los extranjeros cualificados.

Flood assistance deadline approaching

With a deadline looming and many in Western North Carolina still struggling to recover from deadly flooding this past August, officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the U.S. Small Business Association want to make one thing clear: help in the form of low-interest loans is still available, but it won’t be here forever. 

Canton’s future at stake in upcoming election

A scant three months ago, when candidates filed for the upcoming municipal elections, the Haywood County town of Canton was facing the usual set of local issues not much different from any other small-town Western North Carolina government. 

Fishing after the flood: Flood took two-thirds of state hatchery’s trout

When the Davidson River first hit flood stage on at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 17, it was a normal — albeit rainy — workday for employees at the Bobby N. Setzer Fish Hatchery and the Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education in Brevard. But by 5:45 p.m. a river that had mere days ago flowed less than a foot deep peaked  at 14.19 feet, plunging the fish hatchery raceways under feet of water and leaving employees — as well as a volunteer and member of the public who had been at the education center — to scramble for higher ground. 

Sen. Tillis returns to Canton

Almost exactly one month after extreme flooding on the Pigeon River killed six, displaced hundreds and dropped mud and debris throughout downtown Canton, U.S. Sen. Thom Tillis returned to check in on the progress being made as cleanup operations continue. 

The weight of the wait: Local governments look forward to FEMA reimbursements

The aftermath of deadly flooding that killed six people in the Cruso community of Haywood County on Aug. 16 saw federal, state and local governments spring into action. 

‘And then it was too late’: Flood warning timeline reveals challenges of mountain forecasting

On the afternoon of Tuesday, Aug. 17, Rob Young was watching the rain fall. He watched it first through the windows of his office at Western Carolina University and then later at his home in Webster — and, continuously, on his computer screen, where ever-changing river depths were displayed through the state’s Flood Inundation Mapping and Alert Network, or FIMAN

Haywood County Schools has $10.5 million in flood damage

Beginning Sept. 20, students at Central Haywood High School will return to part-time in-person learning. These students have been learning remotely since flooding from Tropical Storm Fred caused severe damage to the school building in Clyde. 

Below the waterline: Fred’s impact on aquatic life remains to be seen

Eric Romaniszyn had been Haywood Waterways Association’s project manager for less than six months when the legendary floods  of September 2004 tore through Clyde and Canton, challenging him to execute his new role addressing watershed health and education in the face of a once-in-a-lifetime weather event. 

Lasting damage: Recreation impacts from Fred could linger for years

A week before Tropical Storm Fred unleashed historically high floodwaters on Western North Carolina, Greg Philipp was in Washington fighting the wildfires  now enveloping the bone-dry American West. Now, Philipp is the U.S. Forest Service incident commander for the aftermath of heavy rainfall that will impact favorite recreation sites in the Pisgah National Forest for years to come. 

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