Bryson City website needs more attention

fr webbrysonConsidering Bryson City didn’t even have a website until 2009, it’s no surprise that it lags behind the other municipalities’ web presence.

Swain County’s website lacks basic information

fr swainwebWith the lowest population and the lowest county budget, Swain County also scored the lowest among the four-county website comparison. 

Cherokee’s web presence a work in progress

fr webcherokeeThe Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ website received the lowest score of any of those reviewed by The Smoky Mountain News, coming in with an overall 1.4 out of 5. 

Sylva’s website scheduled for a makeover

fr websylvaSylva’s website, last overhauled in 2010, will be getting a facelift this year after the town board voted to spend $3,000 on a redesign of the town’s website and logo.

User-friendly website a priority for Jackson

fr webjacksonKelly Fuqua doesn’t have a problem saying she’s pretty proud of Jackson County’s website. Before she overhauled it in 2011, the site was getting “complaint after complaint,” and she sank a lot of work into fixing the problem. 

Franklin strives for open government — even online

fr webfranklinThe town of Franklin’s website is a great example of a small town going the extra mile to encourage public participation in local government.

Macon’s web presence has come a long way

fr webmaconMacon County’s government website started 16 years ago with a shoestring budget.

Waynesville website a reliable resource

fr webwaynesvilleAs the largest town west of Asheville and the county seat of Haywood County, Waynesville is the economic engine of the region, driving development and investment from Canton to Cherokee. Accordingly, its burden is high — some of the most important interactions residents will have with any local government occur on its website, almost 90 times each day. 

Haywood County’s website gets the job done

fr webhaywoodHaywood County’s website tied for the highest ranking in the area despite earning design scores that were sub-par.

Online presence a must for modern government

fr web govtGo back in time 25 years, and a town with a website — any website, no matter how terrible the fonts or funky the navigation — would have been seen as glitzy and ahead of its time. But these days, having a website is the bare minimum of what citizens expect from their government’s online presence.

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