Below the waterline: Fred’s impact on aquatic life remains to be seen

Eric Romaniszyn had been Haywood Waterways Association’s project manager for less than six months when the legendary floods  of September 2004 tore through Clyde and Canton, challenging him to execute his new role addressing watershed health and education in the face of a once-in-a-lifetime weather event. 

How to help flood victims

As the floodwaters from Tropical Storm Fred recede, the full extent of the damage is becoming clear. Residents of Haywood County and beyond have rallied together to create avenues for donations and opportunities to support those in need. Countless churches, businesses and individuals are actively accepting and sorting donations. 

The Naturalist's Corner: Climate change brings more challenges

WNC Climate Action Coalition’s screening of David Weintraub’s new documentary “Guardians of our Troubled Waters” is both a history lesson and a call to action. 

The film, made in collaboration with the Wilma Dykeman Legacy Foundation, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Conserving Carolina, Mountain True, Clean Water Expected in East Tennessee, Friends of the Everglades and Haywood Waterways Association, will be aired at 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 21, at the Lake Junaluska Assembly Terrace Auditorium at 689 North Lakeshore Drive. There will be a panel discussion following the film. The panel will include filmmaker David Weintraub, Eric Romaniszyn of Haywood Waterways, Callie Moore of Mountain True and more.

2004: Floods ravage Western North Carolina

The tiny central Haywood County town of Clyde lies more than 270 miles from the Atlantic Ocean, more than 400 miles from the Gulf of Mexico and more than 2,500 feet above both of them, so it must have seemed like a cruel joke when back-to-back hurricanes over the course of about a week caused unprecedented regional flooding. 

Clyde park to reopen

Much like the Pigeon River itself, it’s been a long and winding journey for the Town of Clyde in recovering from the devastating floods of 2004, but after a few turbulent stretches in its redevelopment, River’s Edge Park off Thickety Road will finally re-open to the public. 

Hurricane prep begins in Western North Carolina

As The Smoky Mountain News went to print Tuesday, a potentially catastrophic storm was barreling down on the Carolinas, with North Carolina poised to bear the brunt of it. 

Through the raincloud: Agricultural community takes stock after record-breaking rains

A month of rain capped off by the arrival of Tropical Storm Alberto has caused massive flooding, landslides and loss of life in North Carolina’s western region, but the mountains west of Asheville were mostly able to escape the devastation experienced in Polk, McDowell, Avery and Buncombe counties. 

“I think everyone’s optimistic that we dodged a bullet to have got 20 inches of rain in two weeks and not gotten any more extensive flooding than what we had,” said Joe Deal, agriculture extension agent for Macon County Cooperative Extension.

Macon flood damage exceeds $1 million

fr floodingHeavy rains and high waters in December have resulted in more than $1 million in flood damage in Macon County.

Public advised to take precautions, be alert

Weather Hazard: An Upper Low moving across our WNC Mountains, coupled with Hurricane Joaquin will produce heavy rain and wind gusts in Haywood County.  From now through Monday morning communities south of Maggie Valley, Waynesville, Clyde and Canton can expect about 10” of rain, while the municipalities and northern communities can expect about 7” of rain.  Wind gusts of 20-30mph are possible, with the highest gusts over our mountain tops.

Expected Vulnerabilities

  • Trees down
  • Power Outages 
  • Intermittent flash flooding in low lying areas along rivers and streams
  • Possible debris flows in drainages and particularly in areas with disturbed and exposed soils where rainfall may accumulate.

Recommended Actions

  • Everyone should maintain close contact with ever changing weather conditions.
  • Be aware of potential hazards around your home, work place and travel paths.
  • Stay away from flooding water and wear a personal flotation device when operating nearby.
  • Be prepared for extended periods of power outages.  Do not call 911 for power outages, call the appropriate power company.
  • The majority of fatalities associated with flash flooding are due to attempting to drive through standing water.  Even shallow moving water can make tires a flotation device!  2 feet of water can float a 3000lb car.
  • Rapidly moving water and debris can lead to trauma.
  • Broken electrical, water, gas and sewer lines can result in severe injuries.
  • Look for tilted trees, poles, fences, walls and holes on hillsides.
  • Be extra cautious at night when it is harder to see flood dangers.
  • Emergency Agencies- Travel around your communities, make a list of potentially hazardous areas and/or vulnerable citizens.  Provide them with good preparedness advice.
  • Extra staffing of all agencies will be helpful.
  • All swift-water rescue teams on standby, once the team leaders have an inventory and roster, share your numbers with the 911 Communications Center.
  • Emergency Management staff will be on duty throughout the weekend.  Call the non-emergency line to 911 Communications to speak with them.
  • Ensure shelter teams are on standby and prepared.  IF activated, the location is our HHS facility (Old Walmart) on Paragon Parkway.
  • NCDOT and municipalities should continue ensuring all culverts; ditches and storm water systems are clear of debris and open.  Maintain emergency access of all highways, streets and roads for emergency egress and ingress.

Haywood braces for flooding, mudslides as heavy rain sets in

fr emergencyHaywood County convened an emergency joint conference Friday to ensure response readiness in the event of flooding or mudslides triggered by the heavy rain expected over the next three days.

SEE ALSO: Public advised to take precautions, be alert

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