A new bistro opens in Dillsboro

fr coachsBy Katie Reeder • SMN intern

A taste of Greece arrived in Dillsboro last week with the opening of Coach’s.

Sid’s on Main closes: New restaurant moving in

fr sidsAfter a solid three-year run in Canton, Sid’s on Main is closing, leaving a huge vacancy in downtown.

This must be the place

art theplaceIt’s my favorite place to sit.

In a diner, tucked away in a booth, with a notebook, pen and endless cups of coffee. It’s where I feel most comfortable, and at peace, when immersing myself in society. While the organized chaos of the breakfast rush swirls around me, I am completely focused on writing, only to be pleasantly interrupted by a conversation or interaction nearby that has piqued my interest.

Food truck trend traveling to Canton

fr foodtruckDowntown Canton could have more food options if the town board approves allowing food trucks to set up shop. 

Chick-fil-A in the cards for Waynesville as Ingles expansion plans crystalize

fr inglesThere’s been a new turn in the much-anticipated redevelopment of Ingles’ super market site in Waynesville: Chick-fil-A has joined the party.

Ingles’ site development plans on file with the town of Waynesville have been updated recently to include a Chick-fil-A fronting Russ Avenue. It will occupy the vacant parcel beside Home Trust Bank and roughly across the street from McDonald’s.

Franklin ordinance regulates grease disposal in quest to prevent clogged pipes

fr greaseThe new wastewater treatment facility in Franklin cost the town more than $5 million to build, but within months of its summer 2013 opening, superintendent Wayne Price noticed a problem. 

“Within six months of putting that into operation, we had fats build up on the walls,” Price said. “It was already getting 2 inches, 3 or 4 inches of fat all around, and there’s no way for us to treat it. We had to do something.”

Greasing the wheels: WNC residents trade petroleum for veggie oil

coverThere’s nothing Adam Bigelow likes better than a full tank of gas in the summertime with an open road ahead. After all, the drive from Sylva to Cashiers, where he works three days a week, is a beautiful, twisting mountain route that’s great for someone who wants to put their steering skills to the test. 

But Bigelow’s feel-good mood comes more from the contents of his tank than the places it’s getting him. He’s been driving a car powered by veggie oil for years, and he’s got nothing but good things to say about it. 

'Shining up classic dishes

art frThe ocean is a long way from Rick Miller’s kitchen. The kitchen is a long way from where his journey began.

“Back then I wanted to be a marine biologist,” the 61-year-old smiled. “And I can still give all the Latin names to the fish.”

SEE ALSO: Mélange of the Mountains returns to Haywood County

My family will miss the Shoney’s on the hill

op shoneysIf someone had told me 30 years ago that someday I’d be sentimental about a Shoney’s restaurant closing down, I would have laughed out loud and accused them of being delusional. I guess I’ve always had a soft spot for their potato soup and hot fudge cakes, which I used to order as a kid when my parents took us there on infrequent trips out of town, but it is nothing I’d ever get misty-eyed over, anymore than I would over a three-piece original recipe chicken plate from Kentucky Fried Chicken.

Then again, 30 years ago, I could not have foreseen the unlikely role Shoney’s would wind up playing in my family history. Not just any Shoney’s, but this particular Shoney’s, sitting high on its perch in Waynesville like an enormous neon bird watching over the bustling traffic on U.S. 23-74 while keeping one wary eye on Lowe’s across the way.

Franklin pub crossroads for people, history

fr rathskellerBy Jake Flannick • SMN Correspondent

The legendary Rathskeller Coffee Haus and Pub, an institution and social mainstay in downtown Franklin, saw a generational changing of the guard this year after 15 years in the hands of its original founder and owner.

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