Homeless shelter planned for Cherokee

cherokeeWork will begin on establishing a shelter for Cherokee’s homeless following passage of a resolution Principal Chief Patrick Lambert introduced this month.

Homeless shelter gets $15,000 from Jackson commissioners

jacksonA $15,000 contribution from Jackson County Commissioners will ensure that housing for the county’s homeless continues through the winter.

Jackson homeless shelter short on cash

jacksonThings are coming down to the wire for Jackson County’s only homeless shelter. Without a fast infusion of cash, Jackson County Neighbors in Need is set to run out of money in under two weeks, and winter is far from over. 

New initiative to provide winter assistance

maconMacon New Beginnings, a new nonprofit in Macon County working to address homelessness, has been hard at work trying to come up with a plan to shelter people in need through the winter.

Franklin homeless ministry seeks new home

fr homelessLowell Monteith is tired of hearing “No.” It seems like everywhere he turns for help, the answer is always the same.

Macon’s only homeless shelter struggling to stay open

fr maconshelterLowell Monteith, pastor of The Father’s House ministry, says the shelter has many needs right now. However, Macon County’s only homeless shelter’s most pressing need is community support.

Three Sylva sites identified for possible homeless shelter

fr jaxhomelessA plan to create a homeless shelter next to Mark Watson Park in Sylva is dead, but Jackson Neighbors in Need isn’t giving up on having a shelter in place by the time cold weather hits again.

All eyes on promised parley between Frog Level merchants and Open Door

fr froglevelWaynesville town leaders plan to broker a sit-down between Frog Level merchants and the Open Door soup kitchen in coming weeks to discuss an on-going conflict over a loose-knit band of homeless people who spend their days loitering and drinking on the streets.

Finding a balance in Frog Level won’t be easy

op frI don’t know if it reaches the magnitude of a moral dilemma, but I feel for the Frog Level merchants who appeared before the Waynesville town board recently. They came seeking help in dealing with the patrons of The Open Door soup kitchen that’s located in the historic business district. 

The soup kitchen clientele, needless to say, are the most needy among us — some are poverty-stricken, others suffer from mental health issues, others have drug and alcohol problems — and so it is bound to come off as callous if you say you want to be rid of them.

The soul of a soup kitchen

fr soupkitchenSpend a few hours on the streets in Frog Level, and the heartwarming stories flow like water.

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