Serving up Southern cuisine and camaraderie

wib roosterThere was little fanfare in 2010 when Mary Earnest opened the Blue Rooster, a Southern diner in a strip mall past its prime.

Taking on the challenge: Bridges balances career and motherhood as casino executive

wib bridgesIf you’d asked Leeann Bridges 20 years ago what her ideal career would look like, she probably wouldn’t have told you she hoped to become a marketing executive at a casino. 

Family pride and persistence: Macon Furniture Mart marches on

wib maconfurnitureLike many women, Karen Buchanan Bacon loves to shop. She loves skimming through Pottery Barn and Southern Living magazines looking for home décor pieces that mesh together to create the perfect room.

Lisa Potts: Every day is Christmas

wib christmasFor Lisa Potts, Christmas isn’t just a holiday — it’s a way of life. Potts owns Nancy Tut’s Christmas Shop in Dillsboro, an occupation that means she spends every day surrounded by Christmas paraphernalia of all sorts.

Women weave talents into successful yarn store

wib silverthreadsThree women in Franklin have been able to weave their multiple talents together to run a successful downtown business.

Hanneke Ware: Making a home in the mountains

wib chaletBack in 1990, Hanneke and George Ware’s odds for success were long. A pair of non-locals living in what was then an even more remote corner of the state than it is now, they’d just purchased a 23-acre property between Dillsboro and Whittier with the hope of creating a sought-after bed and breakfast destination.

Building a legacy: Sheppard Insurance is a mother-daughter, all-woman affair

wib sheppardWhen Kathy Sheppard got her start in the insurance world 30 years ago, she was a pioneer in a male-dominated profession.

A passion for paper: Slusser’s spent her career in a male-dominated industry

wib slusserMost people don’t kick off their retirement by becoming president of a company, but Nicki Slusser is not most people.

Self-made, self-reliant and self-driven: Michele Rogers turns whatever life deals her into a winning hand

wib rogersMichele Rogers had no job, no college degree, no husband and no place of her own when she pulled up stakes in her hometown of Norfolk, Va., and headed for Haywood County in the winter of 1996.

Connecting a community: Women of Waynesville make their mark

wib wowTurning onto North Hill Street in downtown Waynesville, you’re immediately greeted by overhanging maples sporting the latest in fall colors. Pulling into the Twin Maples Farmhouse, the picturesque property is silent, peaceful, as if pulled from some sort of Norman Rockwell painting.

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