Project will track growing number of lots

As Western North Carolina wrestles with growth issues, a project is under way to track where and how large mountain tracts are being carved up into smaller lots.

Emotions build in run-up to moratorium hearing

Frenzy surrounding a proposed moratorium on new subdivisions in Jackson County reached a fever pitch in the run-up to a public hearing on the issue Tuesday night.

Twenty questions

Jackson County commissioners have called for a public hearing on a proposed moratorium on new subdivision development while the planning board authors a subdivision ordinance. Commissioners want the ordinance to address concerns such as steep slope development and minimum standards. Here are 20 questions and answers about what is, what is not, and what’s undecided.

Jackson leaders take a bold – and wise – step

Jackson County took the first step this week to ban new subdivisions until it can write an ordinance to control the proliferation of new developments within its borders. By doing so, its county commissioners proved they have a mettle that is too often lost on elected officials who worry too much about re-election and too little about their constituents.

Jackson may put temporary stop to growth

By Sarah Kucharski • Staff Writer

Jackson County commissioners have taken the first step toward temporarily stopping new subdivision development, calling for a Feb. 27 public hearing on a six-month moratorium.

Upping the ante

By Sarah Kucharski • Staff Writer

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is placing a $650 million bet that visitors to Harrah’s casino and hotel are looking for amenities akin to those that are becoming standard across the gaming industry.

Haywood County prepares for slope ordinance by hiring engineer

Slope development regulations will go into effect in Haywood County on March 1.

Land-use planning takes center stage in Jackson

By Sarah Kucharski • Staff Writer

Jackson County commissioners have set in motion a strategy to make up for the past and plan for the future, directing the planning board to make several land-use ordinances this year’s top priority.

Temporary high-rise ban a wise move

The last thing Macon County — or any of the counties west of Asheville — needs is a high-rise condominium development. Commissioners in that county made a wise move Monday to enact a moratorium on any construction over 48-feet in height. They made use of a common tool often employed by local governments who are looking out for the welfare of their constituency.

Moratorium stops high-rises

By Sarah Kucharski • Staff Writer

Macon County Commissioners unanimously approved a moratorium on high-rise development Monday, giving county planning and legal staff 11 months to write an ordinance that if adopted could potentially prohibit such development for a long time to come.

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