Jackson revisits development rules along U.S. 441

Jackson County leaders appear to be backing down from a lofty vision to transform U.S. 441 leading to Cherokee into a pedestrian-friendly boulevard.

The planning board has spent several months rewriting commercial development guidelines for the 3.5-mile stretch of highway. The result is billed as a compromise that will give prospective developers more flexibility, yet still require basic aesthetic standards.

Jackson to assess potential for ABC profits

Jackson County commissioners in the coming months will weigh whether to open a liquor store in Cashiers, outside Cherokee — or both — but the road to a decision will take a lot of number crunching.

Namely, Jackson County must decide whether it’s likely to sell enough booze to cover the overhead of an ABC store.

Cherokee hopes to broker tourist train deal with Great Smoky Mountains Railroad

The principal chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians will met with the owner of the Great Smoky Mountain Railroad this week to discuss the possibility of expanding the scenic tourist railway to Cherokee.

Chief Michell Hicks publicly broached the idea at a joint meeting of Cherokee tribal council and the Jackson County commissioners on last week. Hicks said little more beyond expressing an interest in bringing the Great Smoky Mountain Railroad to Cherokee.

Cherokee, Franklin search for common ground over Nikwasi mound dispute

fr nikwasigrassMembers of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and some Franklin townspeople would like to see the Nikwasi Indian Mound back under Cherokee ownership.

Incoming: Jackson airport to land a share of increased casino traffic

fr jaxairportThe advent of live dealers and table games at Harrah’s Cherokee Casino is widely predicted to bring sweeping economic benefits to the region — benefits that are so far-reaching even the tiny landing strip known as the Jackson County Airport could land a piece of the action.

Card dealers line up for on-the-spot job offers at Harrah’s Cherokee casino

fr harrahsjobfairHundreds of people stood in line, some for more than an hour, outside Harrah’s Cherokee Casino and Hotel last Wednesday waiting to enter and try their luck — at getting a job.

Festival celebrates native people from around the world

art festivalnativepeopleVisitors to Cherokee can witness the powerful, authentic culture of Comanche, Totonac, Seminole, Cree, Polynesian and Cherokee July 13-14 as indigenous tribes gather for the eighth annual Festival of Native Peoples at the Cherokee Indian Fair Grounds in Cherokee.

New outdoor drama debuts at Cherokee’s Mountainside Theater

art frFor the first time in its 62-year history, the Mountainside Theater in Cherokee has added a new play to its repertoire.

Dynamite rotunda comes to life at Harrah’s Cherokee casino

fr rotundaHarrah’s Cherokee Casino and Hotel never had an entrance that made visitors stop and say wow — until now.

Franklin lacked proper license to douse mound with weed killer

Franklin could face a state penalty for spraying weed killer on an ancient Cherokee mound site because the town workers who did it weren’t properly licensed to use the herbicide.

The state could fine the town as much as $2,000, according to Pat Jones, pesticide deputy with the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. Or, the state could simply issue a warning and not fine the town. Jones said the case is still under review. He was uncertain when a decision would be made.

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