Wildlife through a lens: Highlands couple explores the outdoors one photograph at a time

The years since retirement have been anything but dull for Highlands residents Ed and Cindy Boos. From Ecuador to Kenya to destinations across North America, they’ve traveled the world — camera bags in hand.

The resulting catalogue of photos, primarily depicting wildlife but also featuring plenty of landscapes, includes everything from a young elephant feeding from its mother on an African Savannah to a Smokies black bear giving a wave as it rolls on the ground.

WNC welcomes ‘The Great American Solar Eclipse’

On Monday, Aug. 21, Western North Carolina residents and visitors will have the chance to see a rare total solar eclipse. This is the first time in 26 years that America has seen a total solar eclipse, and it is one of the few that will sweep the nation from Pacific to Atlantic coasts.

SEE ALSO:
• What to do, where to go?
• Eclipse photography takes research, preparation
• Local governments plan for the worst, hope for the best
• How to prepare for the eclipse

The Smoky Mountain News has compiled an eclipse guide containing all you need to know about how to prepare for, view, photograph and enjoy this once-in-a-lifetime event.

Prepare to shoot: Eclipse photography takes research, preparation

It’s safe to say that a good solar eclipse photo requires a bit more preparation than your average snapshot.

Ahead of her time: Photographer shifted the art of the image, fought for women’s rights

Who was Bayard Wootten?

“She was a wonderful, strong North Carolina woman,” said Pam Meister. “She was a skilled photographer. She was a feminist before her time. The more I learn about her, the more I’m impressed with her life.”

Sky’s the limit: Drone operators on front lines of an exciting new industry

coverEveryone enjoys the ground-level Western North Carolina views, but drones provide a whole new perspective on things. 

SEE ALSO:
• Drone technology presents opportunities and challenges
• Drone operators navigate strict laws

With a gentle buzzing, these lightweight unmanned aircrafts are able to soar hundreds of feet into the air to capture some of the most breathtaking aerial shots of life here in the mountains. Tech-savvy entrepreneurs are starting to realize they can make a living out of capturing these images and video footage  enjoying the great outdoors themselves.

Drone operators navigate strict laws

fr drone operatorsDrone operators have found that navigating the Federal Aviation Administration’s regulations is more complicated than navigating their unmanned aircrafts.

Drone technology presents opportunities and challenges

fr dronegoodbadThough it can make certain aspects of life easier, technology often has unintended consequences.

A bird’s-eye view: Photographer publishes aerial views of WNC’s highest peaks

out frIf Garrett Fisher had his way, he’d live on the side of a mountain with a glacier as his next-door neighbor. 

Some people might consider his Wyoming home, located at 5,633 feet above sea level, to be close enough, but Fisher craves more elevation than that. So, he satisfies his thirst for altitude with aviation.

When it all clicks — the art of the angle

art frJohn MacLean will never forget his first photo shoot.

“I was 19 years old and it was at a meat packing plant in New Jersey,” he said.

Standing in the basement of the Cullowhee Methodist Church at Western Carolina University last Saturday, MacLean told two-dozen folks of the Sylva Photo Club about how he got into the business.

Through his eyes

art frPulling into his steep, gravel driveway, the first thing you notice about Gary Montanari are his numerous pets.

“I hope you like dogs,” he said, as several barks are heard from around the property.

The second thing you notice about Gary Montanari is that he has lived an extraordinary life.

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