Archived Outdoors

Equine disease suspected

A horse in Henderson County has been tested for suspected equine infectious anemia shortly after a horse in Surry County was found positive for the disease. 

There are no direct epidemiological links between the cases at this time. However, both cases have been associated with recent sales of racing horses. These are the first new and suspected cases of EIA documented in North Carolina since August 2017. Both facilities are under quarantine, with remaining equines to be observed and retested in 60 days. Neighboring facilities are being monitored. 

EIA is an incurable disease commonly spread by biting flies and ticks or shared medical equipment between equines, such as horses, mules and donkeys. Clinical signs of EIA include fever, weakness, weight loss, anemia, edema and death. However, affected animals may not show symptoms but still carry the disease. EIA does not affect people. 

Regular testing before crossing state lines or participating in an exhibition helps control it. 

Equine owners who have concerns about their animal’s health should contact their local veterinarian. For more information about EIA or other reportable animal diseases call the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Veterinary Division at 919.707.3250.

Leave a comment

Smokey Mountain News Logo
SUPPORT THE SMOKY MOUNTAIN NEWS AND
INDEPENDENT, AWARD-WINNING JOURNALISM
Go to top
Payment Information

/

At our inception 20 years ago, we chose to be different. Unlike other news organizations, we made the decision to provide in-depth, regional reporting free to anyone who wanted access to it. We don’t plan to change that model. Support from our readers will help us maintain and strengthen the editorial independence that is crucial to our mission to help make Western North Carolina a better place to call home. If you are able, please support The Smoky Mountain News.

The Smoky Mountain News is a wholly private corporation. Reader contributions support the journalistic mission of SMN to remain independent. Your support of SMN does not constitute a charitable donation. If you have a question about contributing to SMN, please contact us.