Smoky Mountain Folk Festival returns to Lake J

The 43rd annual Smoky Mountain Folk Festival will be Aug. 30-31 at Stuart Auditorium at Lake Junaluska.

 

Spectators will be treated by performances from more than 200 mountain dancers and 30 performing groups. Each night will feature open tent shows at 5 p.m. on the lawn and the main stage show from 6:30 to 11 p.m. in the auditorium. Tent shows are free to the public. There will also be a free kids concert outside from 5 to 6 p.m.

Performers include Whitewater Bluegrass Co., Ross Brothers, The Trantham Family, William Ritter, Betty Smith, Mike Pilgram, Mike & Maggie Lowe, Spirit Fiddle, Fines Creek Flatfooters, Nick Hallman, Stoney Creek Boys, Mountain Tradition, J. Creek Cloggers, Fall Creek, Green Valley Cloggers, Joe Penland, Mack Snoderly & Flave Hart, Dixie Darlin’s, Hominy Valley Boys, Laura Boosinger, Bailey Mountain. Cloggers, The Cockman Family, Smoky Mountain Fire-clogging, George & Brooke Buckner, Southern Appalachian Cloggers, Don Pedi, Phil & Gaye Johnson, Appalachian Mountaineers, Ann & Phil Case, Green Grass Cloggers, Roger Howell, Southern Mountain Smoke, Paul’s Creek, Carolina Country Cloggers, and others.

Main show tickets are $12 at the door, $10 in advance, with children under 12 admitted free. Advanced tickets can be purchased at the Haywood County Arts Council in Waynesville or the Bethea Welcome Center at Lake Junaluska.

828.452.1688 or 800.334.9036 or www.smokymountainfolkfestival.com

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