Liar’s Bench members find answers to mystery

Gary Carden and Dave Waldrop will lead a discussion on a recent finding in a long-held Appalachian mystery at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 6, at the Macon County Public Library in Franklin.

“Tears in the Rain” is about a chain gang of 19 convicts who drowned in the Tuckasegee River near Dillsboro in 1882. Weighted down by chains and shackles, they sank in the river. Their bodies were not reclaimed for two days and then they were quickly buried in unmarked graves somewhere in the vicinity of the Cowee Tunnel. Two months ago, members of the Liars Bench found the graves that had been a mystery for 132 years. In addition, the group now knows who they were since their names have been found in an obscure file in Raleigh. During the program, Carden and Waldrop will relate the details of how these graves were found and discuss plans for the removal of the remains.

Thursdays at the Library, sponsored by the Macon County Friends of the Library, is an eclectic mix of programs by authors, musicians, and educators on topics designed for enjoyment and learning. 

The event is free and open to the public.


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