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Wednesday, 22 April 2009 16:37

Grandview Lodge

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When Terry Ferguson and his wife Nancy bought the Grandview Lodge in 2008, they knew they were taking on a responsibility above and beyond restoring the old building. With the purchase, the couple became the keepers of an important piece of Haywood County history.

The Lodge was built in 1890 as the residence of the Medford family, who farmed the 800 surrounding acres. The building was converted to an inn in the 1920s, and served as a gathering place for generations of county residents and visitors.

But over the years, the Lodge fell into a state of disrepair. Waist-high grass and overgrown shrubbery replaced the once-manicured landscape. The roof leaked, and the gutters clogged. The community mourned the loss of the landmark.

Then along came the Fergusons, who, like the Lodge itself, were also looking for a new lease on life. The Red Barn antique business that the couple had worked so hard to establish was destroyed in a fire. Devastated and searching for direction, the Fergusons decided to purchase Grandview. It would be the perfect pairing — the inn would get a new life, and so would the Fergusons.

Today, Grandview Lodge has been restored to its former glory. The interior, refurbished with period antiques, looks much like it did when it was built more than a century ago. The 12 bedrooms are beautifully restored, and each features a tidbit of local history on its wall.

The Fergusons have made food a centerpiece of their business. The dining room seats 100, and serves a five-course dinner on Saturday night and brunch on Sundays. Guests won’t find any cans or frozen food in the kitchen, Terry says — “everything’s done fresh.”

Folks who grew up visiting Grandview are delighted to see it back in business.

“It’s been unbelievable,” says Terry. “The folks who come in are so excited to see it kept in its former character.”

Updating the Lodge has been a tough process, but preserving an important piece of community history has made it all worthwhile, Terry says.

“It’s hard work, but it’s worth it,” he says. “We’ve just had a ball with it.”

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