Sat08022014

     Subscribe  |  Contact  |  Advertise  |  RSS Feed Other Publications

Wednesday, 08 July 2009 18:17

Fish stew: better than it sounds

Written by 

While today’s fishermen are partial to the big fillets like brook trout and small-mouth bass, Cherokee used even the tiniest fish, like silversides and shiners, drying them on long strings or making them into stews.

Myrtle Driver, a Cherokee elder, has a recipe for fish stew that has been passed down through her family. Gut the fish, but you can leave the head and skin on. Bake them slowly for a long time, although she isn’t sure how long.

“We don’t time it. We just look at it. We don’t measure either,” Driver said.

Once the bones have become soft during baking, put them, in a pot of boiling water and season with fatback grease and salt.

“The bones will become so soft you can eat them. They just fall apart,” Driver said.

blog comments powered by Disqus
Read 2815 times Last modified on Friday, 15 October 2010 18:34

Media

blog comments powered by Disqus

This Must Be the Place

  • This must be the place

    art theplaceWhen the camera bulb flashed, it hit me — had it really been that long?

    Standing in the Belhurst Castle, a Great Gatsby-esque property situated on Seneca Lake in Geneva, N.Y., I realized it had been around a decade since my childhood friends and I had been in the same room together. And yet, here we were, drinks in hand, smiles plastered across our faces, as family members and dates for the wedding stood in front of us, eager to capture the moment we all were huddled as one.

    Written on Wednesday, 30 July 2014 13:33 Read more...